Boots WebMD Partners in Health
Return To Boots

Quiz: Is my toddler normal?

  1 of  
Current Score:  
slide image

How long should it take to potty train?

slide image

How long should it take to potty train?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Every child is different, but usually potty training often takes from weeks to months. That's from introducing the potty to the time she's going on her own and staying dry most of the time.

Even after your child is staying dry during the day, it can be considerably longer before your child can make it through the night.

Although potty training is a big milestone, and one much anticipated by parents, don't rush it and make sure your toddler is ready. Forcing toilet training on a child who is really resisting can backfire. Instead, try to make potty time fun, perhaps reading stories or singing songs. Offer non-food rewards like stickers or trips to the park.

 

 

slide image

My baby potty-trained at 15 months! Is she advanced?

slide image

My baby potty-trained at 15 months! Is she advanced?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Most parents think about starting potty training when their child is between 18-30 months old but babies don't work to any exact development timetable. Child milestones happen in different children at different times, and some may be earlier or later than others in steps like potty training. Being late to use the potty is not a sign of developmental delays. Equally, children who reach other steps early, such as walking or talking may not be ahead of the curve when it comes to toilet time.

How often should my toddler poo?

How often should my toddler poo?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Some little ones have a bowel movement straight after tea or just before bedtime, like clockwork. Others' toilet habits are less predictable. Most of the time it's not a problem. If there are major changes, such as much more frequent, or much less frequent pooing, painful stools, blood in the stools or persistent diarrhoea, seek medical advice.

My child is hitting and biting. Should I be worried?

My child is hitting and biting. Should I be worried?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Aggressive behaviour is common as young children learn the rules of the world around them. One in five two-year-olds has at least one temper tantrum a day. The immediate solution? You may have to remove her from some situations.

Make sure the child knows you love them, but not their aggressive behaviour. Avoid toddler meltdowns, with regular naps and healthy snacks. Make sure they get chance to let off steam by running around and making some noise.

My toddler loves 'In the Night Garden'. How much TV should he be watching a day?

My toddler loves 'In the Night Garden'. How much TV should he be watching a day?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The NHS recommends that under 2s watch no TV at all. Why? This is a critical time for your child's brain development. TV can get in the way of other, more important learning activities, like active play, socialising and physical activity.

Worried that your toddler is getting too much TV time? Cut back one step at a time. Try turning the TV off during meals. Keep TVs and computers out of bedrooms. Set a maximum viewing time.

Every night is a struggle at bedtime. What should I do?

Every night is a struggle at bedtime. What should I do?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Many toddlers fight bedtime, often they just want to be where you are.

Don't stop his nap to wear him out. Many kids this age still need an afternoon nap. Cutting it can make him grumpy or too overtired at bedtime.

Instead, stick with a consistent, relaxing bedtime routine every night. Give him a comfort object like a blanket or cuddly toy and read him a book. Does he need extra reassurance? Try a nightlight or leave the door ajar.

On play dates, my toddler mostly plays next to children his age, not with them. Is anything wrong?

On play dates, my toddler mostly plays next to children his age, not with them. Is anything wrong?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Toddlers aged around two to three do mostly play next to each other rather than with each other. This is called parallel play. But don't give up on play dates. Early play is important. It helps kids learn to make friends.

Make play dates toddler-friendly by:

  • Keeping them short (less than an hour is good)
  • Keeping them one-to-one
  • Putting away special toys that might cause conflicts 

My child will not eat vegetables. Is it OK to let him live on chicken nuggets for a while?

My child will not eat vegetables. Is it OK to let him live on chicken nuggets for a while?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Nuggets won't work forever because they can make him gain unhealthy weight and he'll miss out on important nutrients. But keep trying. Picky eating is very common at this age. No need to worry that he'll never eat vegetables. Don't 'force' him to eat anything.

Instead, keep offering lots of interesting, safe, and healthy food choices, including foods he can feed himself. Encourage kids to try a mouthful of everything on the plate, rather than all of it. He may shock you one day when he goes for the broccoli. If you're concerned he's not getting enough nutrients, talk with your doctor or health visitor.

When should I take the dummy away?

When should I take the dummy away?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Dummies or soothers can be reassuring for infants. Child health experts recommend weaning them off dummies from six months and being dummy free by the time he is a year old. That cuts his risk of getting an ear infection, tooth and speech problems.

Try to get rid of the dummy as part of the growing-up process. Some experts like Supernanny Jo Frost suggest telling toddlers their dummies have to go with the dummy fairy to new babies who need them.

My child hates it and cries when I leave her at nursery. What should I do?

My child hates it and cries when I leave her at nursery. What should I do?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Your toddler's been doing well but then cries as you get ready to leave. It's common for separation anxiety to rear its head again at about 18 months. You're probably more upset by the goodbye than she is. Most toddlers calm down within a few minutes after their parent leaves. Make a quick goodbye and promise her you'll be back to pick her up.

My 15-month-old sometimes bangs his head against the side of his cot. Should I be worried?

My 15-month-old sometimes bangs his head against the side of his cot. Should I be worried?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

It may seem scary, but many toddlers bang their heads to comfort or stimulate themselves, or to release frustration. Don't let it worry you too much, but make sure he can't injure himself. On the other hand, if the head banging goes along with social problems, for example, if your child rarely looks directly at you and doesn't seem to want to play with you, or if it's been going on for a long time, there may be cause for concern. Check with your doctor or health visitor.

My 18-month-old isn't talking as much as her brother did at this age. Should I:

My 18-month-old isn't talking as much as her brother did at this age. Should I:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The average toddler starts putting words together by about 18 months and researchers say most will know around 50 words or word combinations by the time they are two. If a toddler hasn't started talking by the time they are two it could be a sign of learning difficulties, but they could just be later developing. If you're concerned, just get her checked out by your doctor or health visitor.

Most late-talkers catch up to their chatterbox peers by the time they're at school.

Your Score:   You correctly answered   out of   questions.
Your Score:   You correctly answered   out of   questions.

You have great toddler knowledge!

You're on the right track, but looks like you learned a new thing or two about toddlers.

Uh-oh! Looks like you learned some good things about toddlers and what makes them tick. Retake the quiz to score higher.

Children's health newsletter

Tips to inspire healthy habits
Sign Up

WebMD Video: Now Playing

Protecting kids from germs

Protecting kids from germs

Protect your children's health. Deter germs by keeping surfaces clean and washing hands often.

Popular Slideshows & Tools on Boots WebMD

woman looking at pregnancy test
Early pregnancy symptoms
donut on plate
The truth about sugar addiction
woman holding hair
Natural help for dry or damaged hair
woman in bikini
Get ready for swimsuit season
hand extinguishing cigarette
13 best tips to stop smoking
Immune-boosting foods
The role of diet
79x79_not_good_for_you.jpg
18 secrets men want you to know
boy looking at broccoli
Quick tips for feeding picky eaters
hamburger and fries
A guide for beginners
salmon dinner
A diet to boost your mood & energy
polka dot dress on hangar
Lose weight without dieting