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Treatment for diabetes nerve pain

Nerve pain caused by diabetes, called diabetic peripheral neuropathy, can be severe, constant and difficult to treat. It may start as a tingling sensation, followed by numbness and pain. But there are two key points that everyone with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy should know:

  • Controlling your blood sugar levels can help prevent worsening nerve pain and improve your overall health at the same time.
  • Medications can help relieve nerve pain, make you more comfortable and improve your quality of life.

Better glucose control is the single most important factor in preventing neuropathy, slowing its progress once you have it, and relieving many symptoms.

If you have diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, talk to your doctor about ways to better control your blood sugar.

Once you are doing all that you can to keep blood sugar levels under control - including diet, meal planning, exercise and medication - you should assess with your doctor which pain medication is best to relieve your remaining symptoms.
Fortunately, medications can help relieve nerve pain from peripheral neuropathy so you can function at near-normal levels. You have many pain relief medicines from which to choose. But you may need to try several different types of pain relievers before you find the one that helps you.

Over-the-counter pain relievers for diabetes nerve pain

Some people find relief for mild diabetes nerve pain on their pharamcist's shelves. Common pain relievers and some topical creams may help, depending on the severity of pain.

Anyone with diabetes should talk to their doctor before taking any medication. Even over-the-counter medications can interact with other medicines or cause severe side effects in people with diabetes.

Here are some over-the-counter pain relief options to consider:

NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). These medicines reduce inflammation and relieve pain. NSAIDs available without a prescription include aspirin and ibuprofen.

But NSAIDs can cause harmful side effects such as stomach irritation and bleeding in some people if taken for weeks or months. When taken long-term they can also lead to kidney and liver damage, which may be more likely in people with diabetes.

Paracetamol and other over-the-counter medicines containing paracetamol relieve diabetes nerve pain without reducing inflammation. These medications do not cause the stomach irritation that NSAIDs do. However, taking more paracetamol than recommended can lead to liver damage. It is important to read labels and check with your pharmacist if you have concerns.

Other topical creams. Salicylate is a chemical similar to aspirin, and is found in some pain-relieving creams. Hydrocortisone creams contain corticosteroids, which are anti-inflammatory medicines that can help relieve pain. Both are available in pharmacies, but there is no clear evidence that they help relieve nerve pain from peripheral neuropathy.

Prescription medicines for diabetes nerve pain

Many people need to turn to prescription medication to find relief for diabetes nerve pain. Your choices include:

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