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The weather and your health

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You may have heatstroke if:

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You may have heatstroke if:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

You can develop heatstroke in a hot climate, or during a heatwave. It can also happen during strenuous exercise. Symptoms include:

  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Feeling dizzy, faint or confused
  • Headache, nausea or being sick
  • Muscle cramps
  • Extreme thirst
  • Heavy sweating
  • Racing pulse

You may go to the toilet less and have darker urine than usual. It’s important to seek medical help immediately to avoid life-threatening complications like seizures or loss of consciousness.

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Heatstroke is another name for:

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Heatstroke is another name for:

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Sunstroke is similar to heatstroke, but it’s caused specifically by over exposure to direct sunlight. Heat exhaustion is less dangerous than heatstroke and happens when you start getting too hot and your body starts to lose essential salt and water. Heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke if it’s untreated, so pay attention to your body and take action:

  • Lie down in a cool place
  • Hydrate with fluids
  • Take off excess clothing
  • Apply a cool flannel or cold packs wrapped in cloth to skin.

Which of these is more common in winter:

Which of these is more common in winter:

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Wintry weather and cold snaps can make you more susceptible to all of these health conditions. Cold air is a key trigger of asthma symptoms like breathing difficulty and wheezing. Cold weather can also put a strain on your heart by increasing blood pressure and making it harder for your body to stay warm. Cold sores are common in the winter months when you may be run down, or your lips are irritated by dry, chapped skin.  

Which of these can help prevent winter chilblains:

Which of these can help prevent winter chilblains:

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These burning or itchy swellings develop on hands, feet and other extremities after being exposed to cold. They’re common in winter in the UK due to damp, cold weather. A chief cause of chilblains is trying to warm up affected skin too quickly by using hot water, heaters or radiators. Wearing tight shoes can hamper circulation and also increase your risk. Smoking has a similar effect on circulation because nicotine in cigarettes constricts blood vessels. 

The UK’s Cold Weather Plan recommends heating your home to at least:

The UK’s Cold Weather Plan recommends heating your home to at least:

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Staying warm is a serious matter. Statistics show there were over 40,000 extra deaths during the winter months of 2014/2015 in England and Wales.  The Cold Weather Plan says keeping your home at 18C at least puts your health at less risk. If you’re sick, disabled, very young, or elderly, you may need the heating cranked up a bit more to feel truly comfortable. You can also:

  • Wear warm, layered clothing
  • Fit draught proofing
  • Insulate lofts, water tanks and piping
  • Keep curtains closed after dusk
  • Keep radiators and heaters unobstructed.

 

Which group has seen an increase in cases of hypothermia:

Which group has seen an increase in cases of hypothermia:

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You are considered hypothermic when your body temperature drops to

35C (95F). Babies and people over 60 are more prone to it, as well as people exposed to cold weather, such as climbers or skiers. However, in recent years there’s been an increase in cases of young people in the UK developing this condition when wearing light clothing on nights out.

Your arthritis may feel worse in bad weather thanks to:

Your arthritis may feel worse in bad weather thanks to:

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Research shows that barometric pressure as well as a 10-degree drop in temperature can trigger arthritis pain. It’s unclear why, but it’s thought changes in atmospheric pressure during bad weather, can affect the pressure inside joints and cause tissues to swell.

Which weather conditions can trigger migraines:

Which weather conditions can trigger migraines:

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If you’re prone to migraines, it’s a good idea to keep an eye on the weather forecast. One study showed just over 50% of migraine patients were sensitive to the weather. Other triggers include:

  • Strong wind
  • Drops in barometric pressure.

The weather isn’t the only cause of migraines, though. Other triggers can include certain foods, missing a meal or lack of sleep.

Cold weather can increase your risk of heart problems like:

Cold weather can increase your risk of heart problems like:

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We know that cold weather makes your heart work harder to keep your body warm, but it can also cause dangerous changes in your blood. Being cold can make you more prone to blood clots, which can increase your chances of a heart attack or stroke. Keep warm by staying active and getting regular hot food and drinks to give your body the fuel it needs to stay warm.

You’re more likely to suffer from hayfever in:

You’re more likely to suffer from hayfever in:

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Hayfever symptoms are usually worse in the morning when pollens are released. Pollen is carried into the air as it warms up, so warm, sunny and breezy conditions can make your symptoms worse. The good news is that pollen levels settle down in the evening and on cloudy days. Rain can actually give you some relief by washing pollen out of the air.

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Hot stuff! You’re a human weathervane!  

Getting warm! You’re just a few degrees off when it comes to the weather forecast.

You may be feeling the heat of global warming. Take time to cool off and try again.

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